Model Starter Kit

There is so much to learn about the modeling industry that I will be sharing with you over time, from my own experiences and perspective.  Below is a Youtube playlist I’ve put together, in the meantime, so you can gain some further knowledge from some other professionals in the industry.  If there are any topics/videos you think should be included in this list, please make your recommendations in the comment section below.  Enjoy!

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Stock Photo Modeling

Think Like A Model Shaunna

A lot of people want to model but think they cannot because they are not tall, thin, or have beauty pageant looks.  The thing is, there are so many different types of modeling these days the possibilities are open to quite a range of people.  One such genre of modeling that is accessible for a plethora of looks is stock photography modeling.

How it Works
Stock photography modeling allows a model to use his or her talent of showing expression and embodying different personas in everyday scenarios to promote a product or service.  A photographer or photography company will hire a model with certain themes in mind, capture one or more looks, then upload the best photos to a stock photography website (such as istockphoto, Getty Images, and Shutter Stock).  It is on these websites where companies can purchase the photos that best suit their brand.  After purchasing photos, companies will typically use them for their website, brochures, billboards, and any other advertising medium they see fit.

Because there is no way to know which company will purchase said photos or which specific brand is going to be promoted, logos are omitted from photos and themes are typically generic in nature.  Also, because there is not always a sure way to know which, if any, of his photos will be bought, a photographer will often take and upload many photos with many different poses, expressions, and scenery in hopes of making as many sales as possible.

Know Your Role
Stock photography websites often have many rules, one of which requires a photographer to upload a model release for each model in every single photo uploaded.  This ensures any company that eventually purchases and uses said photos will not have to worry about any legal infringements.  If you are thinking of getting into stock photography modeling, be prepared to provide your signature each time you shoot, whether you are being paid or not.

Think Like A Model Christian

Another thing you’ll want to be prepared to do during a stock photography shoot is provide multiple options of clothing and a myriad of facial expressions to go along with whatever mood the photographer is trying to create.  This will require a bit of acting but, then again, so does most modeling.  If you are banking on your one-trick-pony Zoolander face, this type of shoot might be challenging for you.  On the other hand, if “acting” natural comes easy to you, you might be perfect for this.

As mentioned above, to be a stock photography model you do not necessarily have to look like a supermodel.  This really depends, however, on the photographer or company hiring.  Generally, however, people of average heights, body types, and sometimes looks are sought for this type of gig.  Why, you ask?  Well, for some companies and brands, reaching the every day person is the best way to sell a product.  Companies that sell products to the average person know that they will be able to sell more if the consumer can relate to the people in the ad or commercial.

While some companies like Versace, Gucci and Dior succeed in using people they consider highly attractive, companies like Verizon and McDonald’s would end up alienating a lot of people if they only hired runway models and gorgeous celebrities for all of their advertisements.  This does not mean stock photo models never look like runway models or gorgeous celebrities, but this type of modeling is open to more diversity.

The Fun Stuff
You are literally being paid to be a normal person.  Sometimes a photographer will even buy food, tickets to a game or other things needed to create the scene for the model(s) involved.  My stock photography experience has been a lot of fun and included the aforementioned perks and more.

Another thing about this type of work is it can become pretty steady if you find the right type of working relationship.  My stock photography model stint lasted for two years during which I got paid to shoot at least once a week for the same photographer.  I even got some of my friends hired to model with me!

Think Like A Model Carmae

The Downsides
Because you are signing a model release and are not being hired directly by the company whose brand you will be promoting, you never know where your photos are going to end up being placed.  Keep in mind that photos can be edited.  You might be asked to pretend to write an email on a laptop, only to find out that something sketchy was later photoshopped onto the screen.  Or you might be asked to do a shoot that includes you looking out into the distance only to find out that the best photo from that shoot went on to be purchased by a company that sells STD medication.  Awkward.   If this is something that concerns you but you are still interested in stock photography modeling, ask if the model release will have a clause preventing photos of you from being used in HIV and STD ads, for starters.

Another unfortunate truth to stock photography is that your photo, if used, will likely have you represent a stereotype rather than the type of person you really are (or you might end up depicting a ridiculous scene that makes no sense, as seen here).  Different types of looks sell best in certain parts of the world.  Depending on the agenda of the company buying your photo, you may end up promoting something you are actually against.  For example, I would hate for my photo to end up in an ad for a fast food restaurant but, alas, I would have no say in the matter.  And if anyone recognizes me from such an ad, I might have some explaining to do.

And yet another part to this work that is not particularly appealing is the fact that as the model, you are essentially being paid on a work for hire basis.  You will be paid a flat fee while the photographer might end up making a significant amount of money off of photos with your face in them.

One last thing to note is that, for better or worse, you will likely not receive credit for, and copy of, your work.  If you are looking to make a name for yourself in the modeling industry, stock photography isn’t something you should make your main focus because no one will know your name (unless, of course, you’re Ariane, the overexposed stock photography model)!  On the other hand, if you end up on a billboard about constipation, maybe this is for the better.

What experience(s) have you had in the stock photography world?

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Get Signed

The idea of getting signed to a modeling agency can be quite intimidating.  You know you want to be the next Tyra, Cara, or Adriana but maybe you just don’t feel confident enough, tall enough, thin enough, perfect enough?  But if you’re serious, you would be doing yourself a disservice if you didn’t at least try your luck at getting signed.  Below are some tips on how to increase your chances with the modeling agency that is right for you. Think Like A Model Alexandra Melnick

Know Your Strengths
You might be one of those lucky individuals who takes to modeling naturally and who is effortlessly versatile.  For the rest of us, however, we need to use our strengths to our advantage.  If you have an amazingly toned body, perhaps swimsuit modeling should be your focus.  On the other hand, if you are really tall and thin, runway might be a good direction to take.

All agencies are different so you need to find those that can really market your strengths well.  Figure out who the top models are in that area of modeling you desire to venture into, then find out what agencies represent them.  After you’ve done this, visit the websites of those agencies and find out their submission and casting requirements.

Flaunt Your Stuff
Lucky for you, more and more, agencies are looking for unique individuals.  Your freckles, the gap between your two front teeth, that lion’s mane of curly hair on your head… believe it or not but these are actually assets.  These are things that set you apart from the rest and can get you booked.

Make sure your uniqueness is being accurately displayed in your portfolio photos and digital snapshots.  If you usually wear your hair curly, don’t straighten it for all of your photos or even for your casting; after all, this could be the very thing that gets you noticed!  After you leave the room, the casting directors might say, “She’s a pretty girl but there’s something missing,” when all the while they had no idea you had this unique and beautiful feature.

Get In Motion
Go to as many casting calls as you can.  Quite a few agencies have weekly open calls so you’ll want to take advantage of such opportunities.  You may also find invitation only casting notices in which case you will have to submit your photos and stats to be considered.  If you pass the initial screening process, you will be invited to a closed casting.  If they’ve invited you that means they see something great in you.  Prove them right, show up and win over their hearts!

Don’t Forget
Make sure you bring your portfolio and zed/comp cards to every casting, even if they aren’t specifically requested.  For women, wear heels and refrain from putting on a lot, or any, make up .  Don’t be too flashy with your wardrobe; you’re not going there to get compliments on your fashion sense, you’re going to get evaluated on your looks and marketability as a model.  A simple fitted tank top and shorts or skinny jeans (anything fitted that shows your figure – never wear baggy clothes to a casting call, for modeling) for women and a t-shirt and pants for men will suffice.  Bring your swimsuit (some agencies request that you wear one under your clothes). Think Like A Model Elena Get Signed

 

Be Confident
Shake hands, look people in the eyes, speak clearly and be friendly but don’t try too hard.  Desperation isn’t cute but just the right amount of eagerness will show your passion and let them know you take this seriously.

If you need a friend to give you a pep talk before your casting, give her a call.  If you need to practice your walk the week beforehand, do it.  Whatever it is that will help you not second-guess yourself, make it happen.  Now’s not the time to be shy.  Think of it this way, if there are two people in a room who are both good looking but one has a big smile and the other is staring at the floor, who do you think you would rather get to know?  Casting directors are people, just like you; they just happen to have a different job.  Get them excited about you!

Try Not to Limit Yourself
Many agencies offer non-exclusive contracts.  This is great for many obvious reasons; there are more chances of you getting consistent work and you can still book yourself for your own jobs.   Sign with as many quality agencies as you can and prepare yourself for a full schedule!

Go Where There’s Work
Though there are agencies nationwide, the bigger markets will be able to offer better and more frequent jobs.  If this is your number one passion and plan for life, you should seriously consider moving to a fashion capital (New York and Los Angeles being the top two in the United States).  If you are under age or just don’t have the means to relocate, perhaps it is something to plan for in the future.  In the meantime, you might still be able to find an agency within a reasonable amount of distance from where you live.  Even if a local agency books models infrequently due to fewer jobs, it will be better than nothing and be another hand helping you get work and experience.

Take Care Of Yourself
There is one thing that is true for any job, the healthier you are the better you can perform.  A model who eats well, gets enough rest, exercises, and is generally happy will have more longevity than a model who isn’t.  You’re probably heard of stories about models who do drugs, smoke, and don’t eat a lot, or… ever.  These models don’t usually last very long.  In order to get booked for modeling jobs you’ll need stamina, good skin, healthy hair and nails, and all of your teeth (so… don’t do meth).

Binge drinking with your friends might be fun but it won’t get you work.  If you really want this, you’ll need to consider replacing the cheeseburgers with salads.  Sure, no one really wants to hear that but there it is, the reality.  Trust me, doing what you love for a living is much more meaningful than countless nights of fuzzy drunken quasi-memories and bad choices. Think Like A Model - Fitness - Danae Apel

 

A huge step for any model seriously pursuing a career is getting signed with an agency.  Sure, freelancing is fun and you don’t have to answer to anyone but there are a lot of benefits that come with having your career managed.  Being represented means you don’t have to do all of the legwork, others are there to make sure you get paid, your safety is taken seriously, and those with more experience in the business of sales can get you the jobs you deserve and want.  So, go live the dream, already! What agency do you want to join and why?

Photo Credit: Lola O Photography

Tom Ford Sunglasses

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Don’t Be Fooled!

Think Like A Model Kierra Moss

As an eager new model, or model new to booking oneself, you may very well come across a lot of interesting characters and receive emails that seem a little off.  The first thing you should always remember is that your gut, that feeling that tells you something isn’t right, is usually spot on.  And when it comes to exposing yourself to people you don’t know, you should never take a chance that things might be safe if your gut is screaming at you to run the other way.  But what happens when you don’t get that feeling?  Does that mean that everything is on the up and up?  Not necessarily.

There are quite a few signs that you can look for to help you decide whether or not to move forward with working for a potential client.  Hopefully the following tips will give you a proper guide to making the best decisions.

Company Information
If you have signed up for a gig through a website like Craigslist or Model Mayhem and have received a response, hold off on getting excited.  Did the person responding to you put a name at the end of the email?  Is there a phone number?  Is there a website link or even a company name?  If the answer is no to all of these questions, beware.  Anyone can post an ad online without credentials of any sort.

There are people who mean well and just don’t understand how to be professional (e.g. start-up companies needing models for video shoots, photographers looking to expand portfolios, university students in search of models for fashion projects etc.) but anyone claiming to run/work at a business should have enough sense to give you proper company information. Think Like A Model Toni Call

If things seem like they may be legitimate and the person in question might have just forgotten to include such important information, it doesn’t hurt to ask.  Respond saying you are interested but need more information.  Ask for a phone number and business website and/or links to existing work.  If you feel so inclined, give the person a call (unless their ad/email says no phone calls, which is sometimes the case for busy companies that receive an abundance of responses for their booking ads).

You can tell a lot about someone by the way s/he conducts a phone call.   If things feel weird during the call, maybe it’s not the right fit.  Even if you don’t plan to make a screening call, you should still get a phone number in the event you get booked for the job and need to reach someone on the day of the gig.

Get It In Writing
Ok, so the person who wants to hire you passed the first test and you are stoked about a new fun modeling job.  Not so fast!  Anyone can say things that sound nice and great but when it comes to delivering what was agreed upon verbally, such as payment, things don’t always work out the way they should.  If you are being promised payment and said amount is such that you would be affected if you didn’t receive it, you’ll want to make sure that promise is upheld.

One way to ensure that everything is kosher, as they say, is to get an agreement.  This can be simple; a one-pager containing company information, hiring manager’s name, models name, expectations of the job (i.e. model’s responsibilities), shoot date, shoot time/time frame and payment amount with lines for signatures and the date.  Always be weary of someone who doesn’t want to come to a contractual agreement for a paid modeling job.  An honest person should have no problem proving her words with a signature.  Signing a one-page document promising payment does not require a lot of effort or time but sure covers your butt.

You can even offer to render said contract for the convenience of the person hiring you.  If the hiring manager absolutely refuses to sign an agreement, however, pass.  You’re better off not taking the chance. Think Like A Model Elena Get Signed

Under Pressure
Another thing to note is that people who are interested in taking advantage will often do and say anything to try and get their way.  If you have brought up your concerns about a job or project and, rather than being met with understanding, are given reasons why you should just do it anyway, don’t.  I’ve definitely been told, before, that I’m not going to be able to book jobs if I don’t pose nude.

Oh, really? *raises eyebrow*

Keep in mind that predators don’t care if you feel right about a project or not.  They don’t care if you will ultimately be hurt by doing something that isn’t good for you.  They don’t care if you are young and naive nor do they have to live with the decisions you have made.  They only care about getting what they want.  Don’t ever let anyone pressure you into doing something that doesn’t feel right.

Oh and just so you know, I definitely did not continue to communicate with that person.

Think Like A Model Alexandra Melnick

Email Scams
You’ve probably heard of the infamous Nigerian scam in which someone responds to a for-sale ad claiming to want to buy an object from a private seller, sends a money order for an amount that is way above asking price, then asks for the seller to write and return a check for the difference.  Well, the con artists have crossed over into the modeling world.

The way it works is that an ad will be posted for a modeling job (generally a photo shoot), an unsuspecting model will reply, then the person running the scam will send a really long email requesting a plethora of personal information.  The email will usually appear to be written by someone who does not speak English as a first language.

While this happened to me a very long time ago, one thing I do remember seeing is a large dollar amount that the person promised to mail to me before I were to even do the job.  Why would anyone send money to a random individual before any work has been completed?  Another thing that was strange was that the person said that the photo shoot would be in a location near me and to not worry about travel. I probably don’t have to say it but… that makes no sense.

Though I did not get past this stage, because the email was obviously fake, I suspect these people wouldn’t be doing this if it didn’t work.  Never, I repeat, never give you personal information to a complete stranger via email.  Personal information includes full name, home address, ssn and more.

Believe it or not but identity theft is quite easy a task to complete.  The more a person knows about you the easier it will be for him/her to pretend to be you and ruin your credit or worse!

What are some things you make sure to look out for when applying to modeling jobs?

Photo Credit: Lola O Photography

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Featured Model | Alex Terranova

We had a chance to catch up with my friend, Denver, CO model, Alex Terranova when he came to visit San Diego.  Here’s what he had to say!

also on Vimeo

Height : 6’2     Suit : 42R     Waist : 33      Inseam : 32

Shirt : 17     Sleeve : 34

Hair : Brown     Eyes : Blue     Shoe : 12.5

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

B. IMG_2796

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Alex Terranova on Think Like A Model

Check out Alex Terranova’s modeling profiles with Wilhelmina Los AngelesDonna Baldwin Agency and Revolution Management!
Facebook Logo on Think Like A ModelInstagram Logo on Think Like A ModelTwitter Logo on Think Like A Model

 

Photo Credit: Lola O Photography

Adam Banner 250x250

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Free Photos for All!

Modeling Tips - TFP

So you decided to give modeling a go and realized you need pictures of yourself to book jobs.  You looked at a few photography websites but the rates are just too rich for your blood.  This calls for tfp.

Tfp stands for trade for print.  When a photographer posts an ad mentioning this acronym, she is offering to take photos of a model for free in exchange for the model’s talent and looks.  In the end, the idea is that both parties will walk away with photos to use for their portfolios.

A photographer will offer a tfp to either build a portfolio from scratch, ad a new look to an existing portfolio, or to simply take contemporary photos of a style she has previously done.  Before computers existed, pictures from tfp shoots were delivered in printed format. Now, these photos are generally burned onto a cd (tfcd), saved onto a flash disc, or sent in digital form to an email address via websites like Dropbox.

Doing tfp photoshoots is a great way for beginning models to build their portfolios, and is also highly recommended for freelancers and part-timers when updating existing bodies of work.  For tips on booking photo sessions, make sure to read our post Book It.  The same rules apply for finding your own tfp shoots!

Ok, you’ve booked a shoot.  Now what?

Do your research
Here’s an important question, have you studied the photographer’s work?  It’s recommended to view several photos before making a decision.  A good photographer should be able to get at least a couple decent shots of you, even if you have absolutely no idea what you’re doing.

Ask the photographer for links to his existing online portfolio.  If one doesn’t exist but the photographer is claiming to be a professional, pass.  It is likely that this person is either not up to date with current practices, does not have as much experience as originally claimed, or is running a scam.  Ew.

When looking through the photographer’s portfolio you want to find out if he has experience shooting the types of looks you want to add to your portfolio.  If no such photos exist, simply make sure you really really like the photographer’s work!  This is very important.  While you will be walking away with free photos and experience, it is best that you are also walking away with photos you can use; which is the main point of doing this in the first place.

If you are still willing to work with a brand new photographer who has no previous work to show, keep in mind that you might not end up getting any good photos at all.  At the very least, however, you can use that shoot as a practice round to get yourself familiar with being in front of the camera.

Modeling Tips - Posing

The other side of doing your research involves learning how modeling is done.  Browse magazines and Google for photos of models posing in the exact style of the shoot you are planning.  One of the worst and most annoying things, for a photographer, is having to direct a model the entire shoot.  This is distracting and can take the focus away from taking great photos.  Yes, the photographer knows you are a newbie but you don’t want to show up completely unprepared; that is just unprofessional.  Asking for a bit of direction is acceptable but you shouldn’t spend the duration of the shoot standing there waiting to be told what to do.  It’s always better to try and fail then to not try at all.

Be professional and polite
If you are a brand new model then you have everything to gain, at this point.  Remember that the photographer booking you is a professional and is basically working for free.  While she will hopefully get something out of it in the end, there is a chance that you won’t provide the photos that are desired, at all, because you are still green and don’t know what you’re doing.  That said, always remain humble.

If the photographer is offering a tfp shoot for swimsuit photos, for example, don’t assume she will also be willing to take fitness photos of you.  Politely ask if additional looks can be added to the shoot, once you have established a dialogue.  Another option is to wait until the end of your shoot, thank the photographer, then mention that you would love to work with her again and to please consider you for future tfp shoots.  If the photographer says no or does not call on you for future shoots, drop it.  Remember, you are an amateur and this person makes money taking photos.  What you are asking is that this person do more free work for you.  Pressing the issue or acting entitled would be the same as saying you don’t value the photographer’s work.

Ask all questions necessary to know what to expect the day of the shoot (i.e. what to bring, how long the shoot will last, what type of hair and make up the photographer desires etc.).  Arrive to the shoot on time and be prepared.  If you are expected to provide your own hair and make up, do it before you get to the shoot or arrive early enough to do it on-site.  It is also usually expected that you bring multiple outfits so that the photographer can decide which will be best.  Bring what you know will make you look good.  You will be most comfortable and confident if you feel that you look great.

Modeling Tips - Wardrobe

Be safe!
Don’t let your excitement and eagerness for this new venture cloud your judgement.  Unfortunately, there are a lot of bad people out there who prey on hopeful and inexperienced individuals, such as yourself.

Always meet in a public place.  It doesn’t matter how great the photographer’s work is or how well known he is for his style; if your safety cannot be ensured, it’s not worth it.

Try to bring someone with you who won’t be a distraction (preferably someone who knows self defense).  If the photographer has a problem with you bringing someone to a tfp shoot, that is a huge red flag.  The photographer should understand your desire for caution, as any normal human being would.

It also wouldn’t hurt to tell a third party where you will be shooting.  Worst case, someone will know to be on alert if you are unreachable for an unreasonably prolonged period of time.  Best case, you can tell that person all about your fun new experience!

What are some things you do to prepare for shoots?

 

Photo Credit: Lola O Photography

Prada Sunglasses

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Book It

Modeling Tips - Book Your Own Freelance Modeling Job

If you’re new to spearheading your own modeling career, my guess is you’re probably wondering where to start.  Depending on where you live, your look, and your discipline, this may be easy, require quite a bit of leg work or be close to impossible.  But, let’s assume you live in a booming area, have a marketable look, and are marvelously self-sufficient.  The following are a few ways you can go about finding the right gigs for you.

Go Online 
Visit the most popular free modeling and classified ad websites such as Model Mayhem, One Model Place, iStudio, ModelManagement.com, Models.com, Purestorm and Craigslist and search the talent and casting notice boards for modeling jobs.  Some sites may require for you to create an account, others will provide contact information so you can send direct email submissions.

When emailing, contact the authors of the most promising ads and send photos; at least one headshot and one full body shot.  Depending on the job, your photos might not have to be professional but should be tasteful and truly represent your current look.  Don’t send photos of you when you were 20 pounds lighter, for example; the client will find out when you show up for the job and this could cost you that and future bookings.

If you have one, send a resume.  Even if you only have a little bit of experience (such as walking in a local unpaid fashion show or modeling for a friend’s school art project), sending a resume shows your professionalism and you will stand out from the many others who think a blank email with a few selfies attached is a good way to go.  It is not a good way to go.

Modeling Tips - Selfie

Before submitting yourself, always follow the rules of the ad and include the requested information.  If you don’t have any experience, be honest and mention that in your message along with a nice brief, but friendly, greeting.  Lastly, always thank the recipient for her consideration.

When sending submissions, practice caution and never share personal information such as your home address!

Spread the Word
Mention that you are interested in pursuing a modeling career to people in your family, social group, and even to classmates and co-workers.  You might find out that someone you know knows a photographer, experienced model who might be able to help, or someone in the fashion industry.  My English professor, in college, had a friend who owned a company that put together fashion shows.  He gave her my contact information and that’s how I began my modeling career.

Get Paper
If you don’t have enough professional photos for a comp card, make sure to get some business cards made so you can pass them out to people you know.  Free business/networking cards can be ordered at Vistaprint.com.  If you have a ModelMayhem account or website that displays the photos you do have, make sure to put the web address on your cards.  If you don’t have a website, simply include your name, phone number and email address with the word “model” under your name or list the types of modeling you are willing to do (i.e. print, runway, promotional).  Once you start building your portfolio and have created an online modeling account or website, you can get new cards.  For now, however, you just want people to have a way to contact you.  If you are willing to pay for cards, design one that shows your photo so that people have a better chance of remembering you.

Join A Group
Browse Meetup.com for different groups you can join in which like-minded individuals plan meetings and fun events.  You will have to create a free membership, to use this website.  Once you are signed up, do a search in your area for different fashion, modeling, and photography groups.  Some groups require that you send them a message and request to be added to the group, in which case it is up to the administrator to decide if you are worthy.  Once you are signed up with a meetup group, stay up to date with the events that are being hosted.  These opportunities are perfect for networking.

Modeling Tips - Book More Freelance Modeling Jobs

Network
Look through your local newspaper or online press paper (if you live in Southern California, check out publications such as San Diego Citybeat, San Diego Reader, Pasadena Weekly, Ventura County Reporter).  Find out when and where local events are taking place that involve fashion, photography, and art.  These industries often draw crowds from each other as they are often linked in the professional world.   Now all you have to do is show up to these events, cards in hand (figuratively speaking), smile on face, and network until your heart’s content.  You might get modeling opportunities  offered to you on the spot but most likely you will form business relationships that will help you down the line.

Don’t forget to grab business cards of any photographers walking around shooting the event and let them know you model or are interested in starting to do so!

Follow Up
If you don’t hear from your new contacts within a reasonable amount of time (say, a week), it might be a good idea to send a friendly email re-introducing yourself and attaching a headshot and full-body shot with a resume.  Mention that it was great meeting the person and that you would like to be considered for any modeling opportunity that the person feels might be a good fit for you.  If the person is not responsible for bookings, he might keep you in mind when he hears of an opportunity from someone else.

Now that you have plenty of ideas, it’s time to get busy.  That pretty face of yours isn’t going to book itself.  Well… if it does then you need to get yourself over to an agency, asap!

What are some things you have done to land modeling gigs?

 

Photo Credit: Lola O Photography

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Welcome!

Modeling Tips - Welcome

Welcome to Think Like A Model.  My goal is to foster a safe space where you are provided with accurate expectations of the modeling industry.   A space where you will be revered for your love of being photographed, peacocking on a daily basis, and ordering salads for lunch.  While I encourage a healthy hunger for the glamorous model lifestyle, here, you will learn the reality of the business so that you are better equipped to go forth and be fierce.

Many think modeling is easy; it simply requires good looks (brains being optional).  I would like to challenge that notion.  Those who are successful at what they do in life certainly offer more than just one dimension, for it requires a balance of many talents and skills to rise to the top of your game.

Can you sacrifice staying up late, drinking, partying, and eating junk food whenever you want?  Does waking up before the sun rises and finishing your work long after the street lights have come on sound like something you can handle?  Can you receive information about your next gig at the last minute and be prepared in time to take advantage of a great opportunity you would, otherwise, miss?

Do you require others around you to keep you motivated or are you disciplined enough to maintain a healthy lifestyle all on your own? Can you tough it out in extreme weather conditions, be it in the rain, snow, wind or even blistering heat?  Are you able to work in a different environment and for a different client every day, each requiring you to be alert and to look your best at all times?  If you said yes to all of these questions, you might want to consider the fact that reading something and experiencing it are two separate things.

Modeling Tips - Modeling

Be excited, be enthusiastic, and be receptive to constructive criticism.  Don’t be naive and DON’T act entitled.  As wonderful and amazingly beautiful as you might think you are (and might actually be) the reality is, the modeling industry is an extremely saturated market.  If you show up to a shoot with a bad attitude, you can lose that and future bookings.  In the modeling world, you are easily replaceable.  Because, as amazing of a human being you are, there are many more eager souls just like you who are willing to arrive earlier, work harder, take better direction, and smile the entire time (at least figuratively speaking).  Those who understand that can go far not just in modeling but in life.

Be humble.  Be hungry.  Be ready.  And remember, no one owes you anything. If you are one of the lucky individuals who actually gets to make money doing something you love, cherish every second of it.  If you are just starting out and are doing things for free to get your foot in the door, soak up every ounce of knowledge you can.  Always be aware that just because you are doing something for free, doesn’t mean you get to call the shots.  There are other, possibly more experienced, individuals who are giving you their time, energy, and effort and the best part is, you get to walk away with invaluable tools you can use to further your career. Be appreciative and professional… always. If you realize that modeling is a job that requires patience and dedication, welcome.  If you are reading this blog so you can help someone else take a stab at being a professional model, I am excited you’re here.  I hope you will be an active reader and that you will find this blog helpful and encouraging.

Until next time,

-Lil’ Lola

 

Photo Credit: Lola O Photography

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